How can I impart value to the world?

A big fear of mine is living my entire life without accomplishing anything worthwhile, never doing anything valuable for the people around me. A lot of things I can do feel hollow to me, and I think it’s because they don’t ask anything of me that only I can give. I want to take who I am, and what gifts I have, and use those to create some sort of legacy or positive impact on the world, even if it’s small.

Every time I ask myself questions about what I love doing, what I’m good at, and what I can see myself doing for the rest of my life, I usually come back to some sort of writing. I think that’s what I’m called to do in life, and I’m really happy I know that.

But I’m not sure how exactly to apply that knowledge right now. Yes, I want to write books, but I’m not sure what kind of books I should write. Yes, I enjoy blogging, but I don’t know what kind of blog I can run that is valuable enough for someone to take the time out to read it. What knowledge can I share that someone else hasn’t already said better? Is my life interesting enough to justify asking for someone’s attention, even if only for a few minutes a day?

I really don’t know, and it feels a little overwhelming to think of my small, insignificant self ever making a difference in this world. What can I do that no one else can?

For now, I’m taking the steps that seem best to get me to where I want to go, even if I’m not sure what the particular destination is. Studying English in college and keeping up this blog are two things I know will be beneficial to me as I seek for my mission in life.

I won’t lie, I’ve always felt that being a mother is the most important thing I can ever do with my life and I’ve always known it’s a calling for me. But I don’t know when I’ll be blessed with children and I don’t know how much of my life will be only blessing the family I have, and how much will be using some of my other talents to bless others as well.

I don’t know what my life will actually look like in 10 years, or what my impact in life will be, but I know I can prepare myself to be whoever I need to be in order to make the most of it. I don’t have kids now and I don’t have a popular blog with thousands of followers. I don’t have any books published or even a writing-related career. All I can do, then, is write and develop that skill, and sand off my rough edges while exercising my positive attributes to be a more patient, nurturing, forgiving person for my future children.

I’m grateful I have at least a direction to point myself in. I know so many people my age who have no idea what they want their lives to look like, or what they could do to bless others. They’re just plodding along, not knowing where they’ll end up, hoping the fog will lift and a sign will appear that tells them where to go next. The scary part is, I’m not completely out of the woods yet. I feel that same fog around me quite often, and it’s tempting to give up and simply do whatever seems easiest at any given moment.

But I know each of us has some sort of gift, and a unique ability to make a positive difference. I guess I’ll never be happy as long as I’m ignoring that fact and trying to keep my head down.

On New Year’s Resolutions

New years always bring about a swarm of resolutions, lifestyle changes, and posts about looking forward. Sometimes they only last a few weeks, while sometimes they’re serious commitments that create a positive shift in a person’s life. It can be hard to discern which posts on my Facebook feed are simply “in-the-moment” intentions that won’t last, and which are born of serious introspection and firm dedication to making a change. That’s why I’ve hesitated to post anything on my social media relating to the ending of one year and the beginning of the next. I don’t want to fall into the trap of being too excited about new beginnings and letting the excitement cloud my head.

My blog is titled “Live Intentionally” and last year I focused on “intent” without including much of the “living.” I had so many great ideas to work on, and I started most of them without finishing any of them. I wrote posts about things I was going to do, and ideas I had, but I had no progress reports to back them up.

So, in 2016, I’m not going to post about my intentions, or the resolutions I’ve made for myself. I’m going to post about what I’m doing as I do it, and the end result when I complete a particular challenge or goal of mine. I’ve already started on some life-changing journeys for myself this year and I’m going to finish them.

I can’t wait to share my victories with all of you.

2015 Goals: Focus on Friendship

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I’m going to share my goals for this year in a series of posts (I also post them on Instagram). The most important thing to me is becoming a better person and improving myself this year, and specific resolutions are a must to guide my path.

My first goal is to develop more and stronger friendships this year. It’s been so easy for me to let things slide and ignore my friends until I need them (whether for something tangible or simply because I’m in need of a shoulder to lean on), and the people I once considered my closest friends are hardly friends at all anymore.

What I’ve learned is that we’re all happier when we have solid friendships in our lives. They help us create good memories, feel connected in this big world, and lend us strength to weather storms. People are actually so amazing when you get to know them, and they enrich your life to an incredible degree if you let them. So I want to give more meaning to my life and let more people in, to learn what they have to teach me. And I want to learn to serve others, to think of them first, to be an active force for good in their lives.

One book I’ve read on the topic of friendship and people skills (and will be reading over and over again every year) is How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie. It’s a fantastic book with solid, timeless principles that are pretty commonsense, yet shockingly lacking in the average person’s life.

It was a bit of a tough read for me at first, because I struggle with every single thing the book addresses. In some cases I grumbled about how I didn’t want to stop complaining, or how it was too much work to remember everyone’s name. I then realized I had to work first on the desire to change before I could even get started on the actual principles.

The biggest thing I’ve taken away from only having read it once is that the key to great people skills is to stop thinking so much of myself. It’s not about me, it’s about them. For example, if I spend most of my time thinking of things only I would care about, doesn’t it make perfect sense that everyone else is doing the same? Which means that asking someone to talk about himself is a great way to make him feel like he matters to you, instead of feeling unimportant as you natter on about yourself.

So my focus this year is to force my thoughts away from “me, me, me” as much as possible and center them on what I can do for others instead.

I’m going to ask more questions, listen more, and smile as often as possible. I’m going to say hello to strangers and start conversations with people I see around town but don’t know. By the end of the year, I want to know that more people than not were better off for talking to me. And I want to know a lot more names than I do right now. It’s time to take an active interest in the world and the people around us. Let’s make this year a huge step forward, friends. ♥

Q: What’s your best memory from 2014?